2013

Thesis

Franziska Erlebach

The Creative Process in Graphic Design: Breaking Out of Established Work Modes Through Modularity

The Creative Process in Graphic Design: Breaking Out of Established Work Modes Through Modularity

The field of graphic design is influenced by rapid technological and social changes, challenging us to redefine how we think about the creative design process. In this thesis, the well-known concept of modularity will be investigated from a contemporary perspective as a way to break out of established work modes which rely on a linear design process. Six types of modularity, as defined for use in product design,create the framework for a series of visual explorations. The underlying method is an iterative design process of graphic prototyping and modeling, followed by a critical review of the visual outcome. These explorations demonstrate how modularity can encourage creativity in the graphic design process. The benefit of a modular approach to the creative process is supported by research from the fields of psychology and design.

Angela Norwood, Supervisor
Sandra Gabriele, Advisor

 

Jillian Ditner

Visualizing Bird Migration: Highlighting the Relationship Between Birds and the Toronto Region Through Graphic Design Practice

Visualizing Bird Migration: Highlighting the Relationship Between Birds and the Toronto Region Through Graphic Design Practice

Bird migration phenomenon takes place many thousands of meters above the ground and between distant locales and therefore remains largely invisible to human observers. The goal of this thesis project is to bring migration into focus by using environmental graphic design installations that highlight Toronto’s role as a stopover site for migratory birds and activating a site on the city’s waterfront. The final design artifact is composed of three site-specific elements. The first is a wall-mounted graphic work that functions like a sundial to reveal the cyclical nature of seasonal migration. The second is a boardwalk installation that measures the distances travelled by birds migrating from Central and South America to Toronto. The final component is a map of the primary avian stopover sites in Toronto (hot spots), which encourages visitors to explore the city’s natural habitats.This thesis offers examples of how graphic design can go beyond traditional awareness campaign tactics to call attention to natural processes in the environment in order to create meaningful connections between citizens and the natural world. Therefore the role of design in facilitating human connection to natural cycles is of paramount importance.

Angela Norwood, Supervisor

 

Sepideh Fallahian

From Roots to Routes: Exploring Motif Design as Representation of Cultural Adjustment Following Immigration Arranged According to the Visual Language of the Persian Rug

From Roots to Routes: Exploring Motif Design as Representation of Cultural Adjustment Following Immigration Arranged According to the Visual Language of the Persian Rug

The path to immigration is associated with cultural adjustment to the new setting as a process of emotional fluctuation over time. The goal of this thesis project is to visualize the experience of cultural adjustment process of a sample group of Persian immigrants in Canada according to the visual language of the Persian rug. Since the Persian rug, as a cultural object, has the potential to narrate peoples’ lives, feelings and experiences, it is an appropriate information system through which to visualize the experience of immigration. The outcomes of this study would be innovative forms of the Persian rug as a visual representation of a sign system which enables viewers to observe the visual narrative of the emotional life of Persian immigrants in Canada as semiotic phenomena. In this study, emotional reactions of sample participants throughout their cultural adjustment process were examined through a questionnaire. Subsequently, the data gathered was visualized to create a motif for each participant through a specific system. The motifs were arranged according to the traditional set-structure of Persian rug design. Three modalities of data visualization were chosen for the outcomes of this study: sculpture, animation, and sound.

Angela Norwood, Supervisor
Paul Sych, Advisor